Research Tidbits: What is snow drought and where does it happen the most?

Climate variability and the population boom during the past century have disturbed the long-established regimes of the hydrological cycle and have limited the availability of water resources on Earth. Prolonged droughts have increased water shortage in many parts of the world and stressed ecosystem services that rely on water. Rivers and lakes are drying up … Continue reading Research Tidbits: What is snow drought and where does it happen the most?

Anjuli Jain Figueroa’s Research Showcase: Linking food, water and energy in the rapidly urbanizing city of Pune, India

The Nexus https://videopress.com/v/FdkerOlV?preloadContent=metadata As cities experience rapid economic growth they often demand more resources, including food, water, and energy.  Urbanization transforms the neighboring lands, often displacing agricultural lands, and consequently requiring more food production on less land to satisfy the growing and changing urban needs. The availability of water influences how much a city or … Continue reading Anjuli Jain Figueroa’s Research Showcase: Linking food, water and energy in the rapidly urbanizing city of Pune, India

Lorrayne Miralha’s Research Showcase: Environmental drivers of change and hydrological modeling: Novel considerations for future management in the US

I come from a rural community in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where agriculture is the main economy. During most of my life, I lived on a small farm surrounded by other farms that nowadays are a mix of settlements and bare lands. By seeing the changes in my surrounding from childhood to adulthood, I questioned … Continue reading Lorrayne Miralha’s Research Showcase: Environmental drivers of change and hydrological modeling: Novel considerations for future management in the US

Research Tidbit: Where will snow survive in a warming world?

Higher snowfall intensity is associated with reduced impacts of warming upon winter snow ablation Climate change is transforming winters throughout the western U.S. Warmer temperatures and winter rainfall reduce the magnitude of snow accumulation and alter the timing of snowmelt. Snowcapped mountaintops, characteristic of the western U.S, melt earlier in the spring, sending water rushing … Continue reading Research Tidbit: Where will snow survive in a warming world?

Danielle Tijerina’s Research Showcase: Contemplations on large-scale hydrologic modeling

I recently found myself reviewing the opening chapter of my very first hydrology textbook—Physical Hydrology by S. Lawrence Dingman. Here, Dingman expresses that hydrology can be broadly described as having two principal focuses: 1) the global hydrologic cycle—studying quantity and distribution of water across components of the global water system and 2) the land phase … Continue reading Danielle Tijerina’s Research Showcase: Contemplations on large-scale hydrologic modeling

Research tidbit: New study reveals widespread and seasonally variable antibiotic concentrations in rural streams and drinking water wells

In both human and veterinary medicine, antibiotics are used to combat infections, and the extent of antibiotic use is on the rise. Antibiotics consumed by humans and animals can end up in the environment through a number of different pathways including wastewater treatment facility effluent, septic leaching, and runoff. Once in the environment, antibiotics can … Continue reading Research tidbit: New study reveals widespread and seasonally variable antibiotic concentrations in rural streams and drinking water wells

Brendan O’Leary’s Research Showcase: Evaluating the pathways and risks for shallow urban groundwater in the Great Lakes Basin

Urban centers face many environmental issues that can lead to direct impacts on community health, property values, and environmental justice.  Understanding pollutant movement in the environment and how it impacts urban health is critical for sustainable urban development, particularly when evaluating the sustainability of urban water systems. This cross-over between urban health and hydrology brought … Continue reading Brendan O’Leary’s Research Showcase: Evaluating the pathways and risks for shallow urban groundwater in the Great Lakes Basin

ECR Hydrology Research Tidbit: The Value of the 40-Year Airborne Gamma Snow Product

A new study shows that the 40-year and ongoing airborne gamma Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) dataset from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which is a key component in water management, has substantial potential to be used as a long-term, reliable reference SWE across the United States and Southern Canada.  Credit: Airborne Snow Survey … Continue reading ECR Hydrology Research Tidbit: The Value of the 40-Year Airborne Gamma Snow Product

Esther Lee’s Research Showcase: What does hydraulic redistribution tell us about how ecosystems respond to climate change?

PHD CANDIDATE IN UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS—URBANA CHAMPAIGN During her adolescence, Esther met a girl in Kenya who struggled a whole day to get fresh drinking water. Looking at the girl, she wondered: Why do some children waste fresh water in luxury while other children suffer from drinking waste water? Why do some children get public … Continue reading Esther Lee’s Research Showcase: What does hydraulic redistribution tell us about how ecosystems respond to climate change?

ECR Hydrology Research Tidbit: Freshwater? Deep in the Sea?

Much like groundwater discharges into rivers and streams, groundwater also discharges into the ocean. The discharge of terrestrially based water to the coastal ocean is called submarine groundwater discharge, or SGD, and has been observed globally, particularly in nearshore environments. SGD impacts both terrestrial and marine environments. It discharges terrestrially-based water that is frequently high … Continue reading ECR Hydrology Research Tidbit: Freshwater? Deep in the Sea?